Science

Mount St. Helens Volcano could erupt in future, but not anytime soon

St. Helens Volcano is likely to prepare for eruption, but not anytime soon

The Pacific Northwest Seismic Network has detected more than 130 small intensity earthquakes under Mount St. Helens since March 14. The low-magnitude earthquakes suggest scientists that they are activating Mount St. Helens volcano for another eruption. There may have been more earthquakes, but were minor enough to be non-detectable. The rate of earthquakes has been increasing gradually, and reached to almost 40 quakes per week.

How Solar System was Formed and Evolved? Tailless Comet Could Provide an Answer

How Solar System was Formed and Evolved? Tailless Comet Could Provide an Answer

A tailless comet has been discovered by astronomers with the help of Pan-STARRS telescope. Named C/2014 S3, the first-of-its-kind tailless comet thought to have been knocking around the space since our solar system was formed.

The unique space object holds clues about the formation and evolution of the solar system, as per a new study on the comet published in the journal Science Advances. The comet is an ancient body that may have returned from the edge of the solar system.

Mount Paektu Volcano could erupt in future as seismologists notice signs of heightened activity

Mount Paektu Volcano could erupt in future as seismologists notice signs of heightened activity

According to an international group of scientists studying the volcanic area in China and North Korea, the volcano can possibly erupt in the coming time as seismologists have observed a few signs of heightened activity.

Octopuses change color to show aggression and other social behaviors: study

Octopuses resolve fights using color to mark their mood: study

Octopuses are social animals that change their body colors to show aggressiveness and intimidate their neighbors, a video footage of a group of the sea creatures in Jervis Bay revealed.

The previously unknown behavior of octopuses was recorded by a local diver and the study co-author, Matthew Lawrence. It immediately drew the attention of octopus experts, including University of Sydney’s Prof. Peter Godfrey-Smith and Alaska Pacific University’s Professor David Scheel.

Quasar SDSS J1011+5442 astonishes astronomers with its fast changing data

Quasar SDSS J1011+5442 astonishes astronomers with its fast changing data

Astronomers were surprised to notice that a quite quasar named SDSS J1011+5442 changed dramatically over the last 12 years. First noticed in 2003, quasar SDSS J1011+5442 has possibly eaten out its own fill in the recent years. The research team from University of Washington used the spectrum measurements of the quasar to calculate various factors. The reading for year 2015 suggests that the hydrogen-alpha emission declined by a factor of 50.

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