Health

Allergy season gets an early start

Allergy season typically starts in spring but this year this irritating health issue has got an early start, than to February’s spring-like weather.

Despite spring being around a month away, higher than usual temperatures this February are not only making trees to start budding earlier but also luring people to spend more time outdoors. Numerous areas in the United States have reported high pollen counts weeks earlier than usual.

Doctors in areas like Hampton Roads in Newport are already seeing pollen allergy-sufferers suckered in by the higher-than-usual temperatures.

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Changes in early infancy brain can predict autism diagnosis at age of 2: study

Changes in early infancy brain can predict autism diagnosis at age of 2: study

Changes in the brain in early infancy can predict diagnosis of autism at age of 2 years in kids who have older autistic siblings, according to findings of a new autism study.

A team of researchers scanned brains of children facing “high” risk of developing autism because of an older brother or sister’s diagnosis. They also scanned brains of kids who had no family history of the devastating disease.

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Opioid-related deaths on the rise in Massachusetts

Opioid-related deaths on the rise in Massachusetts

The number of deaths related to opioid overdoses in Massachusetts continued to soar in 2016, the state Department of Public Health (DPH) underlined in its latest report.

According to the newly released DPH report, nearly 2,000 opioid-related deaths occurred in Massachusetts last year. Unintentional overdoses accounted for a total of 1,465 deaths, while 469 to 562 deaths were suspected to be caused by opioid-related issues.

The report also revealed that fentanyl played a role in as many as three-quarters of the fatalities recorded last year.

Climate change will bring deadly consequences: experts warn

Climate change will bring deadly consequences: experts warn

Climate change will cause more deadly heat waves, infectious diseases and catastrophic food shortages in the future, experts warned at the recently held Climate & Health Meeting.

The meeting, which took place on Thursday at the Carter Center in Atlanta, was organized to replace the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) climate change conference that was abruptly canceled by the federal agency in January, ahead of President Trump’s inauguration.

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Americans are now more stressed: survey

Americans are now more stressed: survey

People in the United States are now more stressed than they used to be a decade ago, a fresh survey by the American Psychological Association (APA) revealed.

In a poll conducted by APA, Americans not only reported anxiety and stress around their personal life issues like work and money but also cited politics as a serious stress-causing factor in their lives.

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Survival rates improve for preterm infants

Survival rates improve for preterm infants

Survival rates for extremely preterm infants, babies who born between 22 and 24 weeks of pregnancy, have slightly improved from a decade ago, according to a new research.

A team of researchers collected data on survival rates and neurodevelopmental impairments for nearly 4,000 early preterm infants from a National Institutes of Health research network. A deep study of the data indicated that survival rates of preterm babies born between 2000 and 2011 improved from 30 per cent to 36 per cent.

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Postpartum depression may affect men too: researchers say

Postpartum depression may affect men too: researchers say

Women are not the only group that can suffer postpartum depression as a new study has revealed that even fathers-to-be can also face a significant risk of developing this condition.

While the stigma around postpartum depression is fading away and many new mothers are openly discussing their condition and are reaching out for help; few know that this disorder also affects new fathers.

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Small percentage of patients found responsible for spreading lethal Ebola epidemic

Small percentage of patients found responsible for spreading lethal Ebola epidemic

A small percentage of so-called “superspreaders” was likely responsible for spreading the lethal Ebola epidemic that left thousands of people dead in West Africa, according to a new study.

A team of experts from New Jersey’s Princeton University and the Oregon State University estimated that merely 3 per cent of people infected with the Ebola virus were the source for more than 61 per cent of all cases of the deadly disease in Western African countries.

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Study links heavy snowfall to higher heart attack risk for men

Study links heavy snowfall to higher heart attack risk for men

A fresh Canadian study has suggested that men may be at a notably higher risk of suffering a fatal heart attack following a heavy snowstorm.

Researchers from the University of Montreal found in the study that compared with periods without snow, men were 16 per cent more probable to suffer a heart attack and 34 per cent more probable to die from a heart attack after a storm dropped at least 8 inches of snow.

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High price may keep deflazacort drug out of several patients’ reach

High price may keep deflazacort drug out of several patients’ reach

A drug recently approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) to treat a rare form of muscular dystrophy may be out of reach of many patients due to its hefty price.
Marathon Pharmaceuticals will sell the FDA-approved deflazacort drug under the brand name Emflaza for nearly $89,000 for a year’s worth of treatment. The figure represents 70 times higher price for the drug than what it costs outside the United States.

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