Are you looking for looking for high-quality siding and roofing services? Do not look past Aloha...

Are you looking for looking for high-quality siding and roofing services? Do not look past Aloha...

With decades of experience in the for-profit and non-profit worlds,...

Hippos have finally made their triumphant return to the Dallas Zoo! After one year of intense...

Following increased profits in property sales in 2016, Northern California’s housing market is...

NASA’s SOHO spacecraft spots comet approaching sun to meet its end

NASA’s SOHO spacecraft spots comet approaching sun to meet its end

Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spotted a bright sungrazing comet diving toward the Sun at a speed of about 1.3 million miles an hour on August 3 to 4, 2016. The comet was first spotted by the spacecraft on August 1. The comet is identified as belonging to the Kreutz family of comets.

Frozen nuclear waste from Project Iceworm at Arctic would be exposed as ice sheet melts

Frozen nuclear waste from Project Iceworm at Arctic would be exposed as ice sheet melts

During cold war, the United States was running a secret army program known as Project Iceworm. The program involved implanting nuclear missiles launch sites beneath Greenland ice sheet. After the end of the program, the army left behind lots of nuclear waste thinking the arctic surface would always remain frozen, but then they did not realize their prediction could go wrong.

Researchers find evidence of septic arthritis in elbow of 70-million-year-old duck-billed dinosaur

Researchers find evidence of septic arthritis in elbow of 70-million-year-old duck-billed dinosaur

Researchers have found that dinosaurs have something more in common with us than thought at first as they used to live in groups, required food to survive and even had joint pain.

They have discovered proof of septic arthritis in a 70-million-year-old duck-billed dinosaur’s elbow, making it the earliest case of the ailment ever documented.

Inner ear of 27 million-year-old odontocete looked lot like today's toothed whales, researchers find

Inner ear of 27 million-year-old odontocete looked lot like today's toothed whales, researchers find

In the ocean’s dark depths or the foggy shallows, seeing objects, prey or predators isn’t an easy task to do. But, dolphins, orcas, porpoises, and other toothed whales notably possess a way to ‘see’.

Scientifically known as odontocetes, the toothed whales take help of echolocation, emitting sounds and hearing how they echo back to map their surroundings. The sounds released by them are at a specifically high frequency, something adding better details to their auditory map.

Moon Express clears One Bureaucratic Hurdle, Reaches Step Closer to Launch of Lunar Landing Mission

Moon Express clears One Bureaucratic Hurdle, Reaches Step Closer to Launch of Lunar Landing Mission

Until now, no private space company has managed to land its rocket on the moon. If everything goes well, Moon Express could be the first in the sector to send a robot to the earth’s natural satellite in next fall.

According to the company officials, it has taken a step closer to achieve the milestone. Currently, Moon Express and its officials are in the midst of bureaucracy.

Dancing Sunflowers: New Study unveils How yellow-headed Plants Trace Sun’s Movement

Dancing Sunflowers: New Study unveils How yellow-headed Plants Trace Sun’s Movement

You may have studied in your school books about sunflowers’ unique and interesting feature of following the movement of the sun. The plant moves from east to west while facing the sun. This process is known as heliotropism.

Do you know that sunflowers continue their graceful movements also at night? When the sun sets, they reorient and move their heads again to the east and expect the sun the next morning. How these plants move and why?

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