Endangered Gray Wolves Making a Comeback in California

Just three years after gray wolves were placed on California's endangered species list, two packs of the animals have been located. The Shasta pack was identified in 2015 and now another pair of gray wolves has been picked up on trail cameras in Northern California's Lassen County. Dubbed the Lassen Pack, this pair and their pups are the second pack of gray wolves documented in California in recent years. Scientists began to realize a second pack was active in California last year.

It is known that the male of the pair came from Oregon's Rogue pack; the female's history is not known. The pair has produced at least three pups. The juvenile wolves and their mother have been monitored as they crossed wood stands, private properties, and commercial lands in western Lassen County and parts of Plumas County.

Evidence of this new pack was found in May of this year and, after some effort, the female was captured and examined; various tissue and fluid samples were collected from her. She was fitted with a tracking collar before being released back into the wild. Scientists hope that tracking the female wolf will give them useful information on her travels, and her survival, eating, and mating habits.

At that time the wolf was collared, the fact that she had given birth earlier was noted, and after her release, she and her pups were tracked carefully. In a stroke of great luck, cameras captured footage of the pups playing together in the open.

Gray wolves were placed on the endangered species list for California in 2014. A year later, the Shasta pack was documented in Siskiyou County, making it the first pack in the state in about 90 years. Although the Shasta pack's present status is not known, at least one member was spotted in Nevada last year.

Information obtained from http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-gray-wolf-pack-lassen-201707...


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