Discovery of 100K-year-old skulls in China may shed more light on humans’ evolution

Discovery of 100K-year-old skulls in China may shed more light on humans’ evolution

A team of researchers claimed to have unearthed two 100,000-year-old skulls in China that may shed more light on evolution of humans. The skulls are believed to belong to hybrids of humans called Neanderthals and a third inexplicable race.

The skulls, which were unearthed at an excavation site in Xuchang, central China, feature modest bone rides on the brow, large brain capacity, and lightly-built cranial vaults similar to early modern humans.

Anthropologist Erik Trinkaus, who co-authored the study, said the skulls display a low and board braincase rounding on to the underside of the skull as with Middle Pleistocene early humans in Eurasia.

Sharing their findings, Trinkaus added, “What these fossils show is that these groups were basically not separate. The idea that there were separate lineages in different parts of the world is increasingly contradicted by the evidence we are unearthing.”

The partial skulls offer new evidence of the behavior as well as distribution of pre and early populations of modern humans in Eurasia.

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