Study links heavy snowfall to higher heart attack risk for men

Study links heavy snowfall to higher heart attack risk for men

A fresh Canadian study has suggested that men may be at a notably higher risk of suffering a fatal heart attack following a heavy snowstorm.

Researchers from the University of Montreal found in the study that compared with periods without snow, men were 16 per cent more probable to suffer a heart attack and 34 per cent more probable to die from a heart attack after a storm dropped at least 8 inches of snow.

The researchers reached the conclusion after examining a number of decades of health data for patients hospitalized in Quebec. However, the same study didn’t found link between a heavy snowstorm and an increased risk of heart attack among women.

Dr. Nathalie Auger, who led the study, said, “We found that both the quantity and duration of snowfall were associated with an increased risk of heart attack for men but not women.”

The research indicated that shoveling might be the reason why men are more likely to suffer a deadly heart attack after a heavy snowfall.

The study was detailed in the Monday (Feb. 13th) edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ).


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