Study blames climate change for 2016’s super warm Arctic winter

Study blames climate change for 2016’s super warm Arctic winter

While skeptics like Donald Trump aren’t ready to accept the existence of climate change, a new study suggested that 2016’s super warm Arctic winter would have been ‘extremely unlikely’ without climate change.

Trump has repeatedly called manmade global warming and the resultant climate change a “hoax’ crafted by China. But, scientists around the globe continue to blame increase use of fossil fuels in addition to other human activities for the problem.

The Arctic region currently covered by sea ice is much smaller than it was in 2012 at this time of year. In 2012, the region experienced its lowest ice extent in the month of September, but 2016 has repeatedly broken than record since mid-October.

A team of researchers from University of Melbourne and World Weather Attribution, a consortium of scientists who perfect the study of how a changing climate affects local weather conditions, and used climate change models, including and excluding human caused carbon emissions, to determine whether humans are responsible for the Arctic region’s record warm summer this year.

They found that the temperatures above 80 degrees North latitude were would be highly improbable in a climate unperturbed by human influences.

Researcher Andrew King, from University of Melbourne, said, “We found that in our natural simulations, those without any human influences, we didn’t see Arctic winters as warm as this at all.”

Lowering emissions of greenhouse gases can help tackle the problem of climate change, which has swelled the number of deadly calamities like hurricanes, droughts and floods in various parts of the world over the past few years.


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