Killer Whales Eating a Living Shark Captured in California

Killer Whales Eating a Living Shark Captured in California

A rare footage captured using a drone shows a pod of killer whales eating a living shark. The video was captured by wildlife photographer Slater Moore in Monterey Bay, California. Killer whales are fierce predators and the video shared by Mr. Moore shows two female adult killer whales and two young killer whales attacking a shark.

Moore captured the rare footage with a camera mounted on a drone while he was aboard SeaWolfe II for a whale watching tour. The tours are operated by Monterey Bay Whale Watch and the company owner and marine biologist Nancy Black informed that she has witnessed many incidents of killer whales attacking and successfully hunting other life forms in the sea.

Black talked about an interesting incident when killer whales were chasing a group of sea lions. However, as killer whales approached sea lions, humpback whales chased them away. But soon, killer whales found another group of sea lions. Whale watchers generally term humpback whales as the ‘humanitarians of the sea’.

Taking about rare footage of killer whale attack on shark, marine biologist Katlyn Taylor said, “They’re kinda tricky animals to study. They hold their breath a long time, they swim really fast, they travel way offshore. That’s part of the fun though, you never know what’s going to happen.”

Researchers said that the shark attacked in the video shared by Mr. Moore was possibly a sevengill shark. The species belongs to cowshark family and other sharks usually stay in deep water.

A report published by Mercury News informed, “Killer whales, also known as orcas, are actually the world’s largest dolphins; they eat fish, seals and sometimes even whales. And humpbacks seem to have a vendetta against orcas that attack marine mammals.”

The more commonly spotted killer whales for the Monterey Bay are called transient killer whales, which mainly eat other mammals.

Sanctuary Cruises in Moss Landing, has witnessed determined humpbacks chase off killer whales in two separate instances, once when they were hunting a gray whale calf and again when they were attacking a group of sea lions.


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