Japanese Researchers Develop Humanoid Robot that Sweats

Japanese Researchers Develop Humanoid Robot that Sweats

Japanese researchers have developed a humanoid robot that sweats to remain cool even after working hard. As most of the machines need some solution for cooling, this humanoid robot is using sweating to keep itself cool. The robot named Kengoro has been developed by robotic experts at the University of Tokyo.

The robot is able to do pushups without getting overheated. The research team shared video of Kengoro doing pushups. Instead of using complicated water cooling systems, the research team used a new technique in Kengoro.

Kengoro is 1.7 meters tall and weighs 56 kilograms. The research team managed to 3D print the robotic body and changed the density of the metal. Additionally, the grooves in the metal were made much less dense and this allows the robot to sweat.

As humanoid robots are generally heavy and have lot of small machines, it is not easy to add additional cooling system. On an average a humanoid robot has over 100 small motors.

The research team was led by Toyotaka Kozuki. In an interview with IEEE Spectrum, Kozuki said, "Usually the frame of a robot is only used to support forces. Our concept was adding more functions to the frame, using it to transfer water, release heat, and at the same time support forces."

Kengoro's sweat, like many technological breakthroughs, is inspired by structures and phenomena already present in nature. Artificial perspiration has some drawbacks. While Kengoro can run for about half a day on a cup of deionized water, it needs to rehydrate in order to function for longer periods of time, much like humans have to do. The new method is also not as effective as a traditional radiator for robotic cooling, though it is considerably less bulky, informed a report published in CS Monitor.


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