NASA's Cassini probe closes significant chapter on Saturday as it makes final close flyby of Enceladus

NASA's Cassini probe closes significant chapter on Saturday as it makes final close flyby of Enceladus

Scientists said that plume of gas discovered on Enceladus south polar section has stemmed from liquid water that is present in moon's icy surface and has given a clue that environment of Saturn moon could be appropriate for life.

As per a statement given to FoxNews, NASA's Cassini probe has closed a notable chapter on Saturday, as it made its final close flyby of the ocean-bearing moon of Saturn, Enceladus.

The final Cassini flyby is not going to say good bye to all regions of Enceladus instead would attempt to map the internal heat of the icy moon while taking advantage of Saturn's Earth-years-long winters for understanding the perfect conditions of the moon and the planet.

This is not going to be the end of the Cassini mission as the hard-working probe will keep on collection data and images deep into 2017. It will observe Enceladus, though it will be at a far more distance as compared to today's approach.

The flyby has marked the back up of a chapter in space exploration that disclosed so much information regarding Saturn and its system of moons. Cassini’s Saturday's flyby was its 22nd visit to Enceladus.

NASA added that when the photograph was captured, Cassini was nearly 1.3 million miles from Enceladus and about 1.6 million miles from Tethys. However, scientists are not favor of it going quite close this time around so that its Composite Infrared Spectrometer can correctly notice heat flow on the Enceladus’ south polar terrain.


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